Tag Archives: violence

Emotional Maturity VS Emotional Immaturity

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First let’s identify what emotional immaturity is:

1. Moody most of the time
2. Demanding that others cater to their every whim
3. Irresponsibility, not dependable, easily influenced by others
4. Feeling not good enough and gives up easily
5. Violent, blaming, reckless
6. Fearful, easily offended, insensitive, inconsiderate
7. Cynical, unstable, complains

Second let’s identify what emotional maturity is:

1. Flexable, result oriented, determined
2. Composed, peaceful, makes effort to be cooperative
3. Has values, humble, has goals
4. Able to face uncomfortable and frustrating situations
5. Compassionate, kind, happy, patient
7. Aware of how their behavior impacts others

Your emotions give energy to the mind. Emotions are your feelings that can manifest into physical results. You can decide to hurt or care for others with is energy. You can develop new behavior with creative thinking, strong decisions and self-discipline.

We have been programed and conditioned since we were children to be mature or immature, so start by examining your behavior. What have lies have you absorbed about yourself? Change for the better can only come from awareness. Your behavior is an indication of where you are stuck in certain emotions or where your are free in certain emotions. Feel your feelings. The best way to overcome being stuck is to sit with being uncomfortable.

Feelings are not permanent, feelings are temporary, they come and go all the time. Where are your weak areas? Make the determination to work on those areas. Choose your responses. Choose to be aware and awake, don’t sleep walk your life.

Emotional Maturity is learned. It is the ability to choose your responses. It is the best way to have a happy life.

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Thoughtful Thursdays #72 – Shame

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Shame will kill you and it is dangerous. Most suicides are shame based, addictions, acting out, aggression, violence are shame based. Shame is also a very social condition where we compare ourselves to others.

Shame effects intimacy, shame effects self esteem. Shame holds us back and makes us fearful of everything. Shame is pervasive, insidious, invisible and full of hatred

Shame shows up in toxic relationships and chaos. Shame shows up when you find yourself beating yourself up. Shame brings guilt, sadness, regret.

Shame will destroy your life. Shame shows up in not caring for yourself.

Shame shows up in the underachiever and overachiever. Shame will stop you from thinking.

Thinking is the only way to save yourself from further self inflicted injury be it emotional or otherwise. Thinking will grow your self esteem and see the possibilities of getting out of any mess you are in.

Brene Brown is a shame researcher and she says: if we share our story with someone who is empathetic, shame has no where to live, it cannot exist. This is where you will start to heal the pain of feeling shameful.

Think for yourself especially if you had toxic people around you when you were little. At any time in our lives we can mistakenly absorb shame because there are so many shame based people in our environment. Get rid of it. Stop believing lies about yourself. Test the lies and you will see they are not the truth. Challenge all notions of negativity. Shame is a useless, wasteful emotion.

We heal slowly one word at a time, one thought at a time, one breath at a time.

Find those who you can trust and who will lift you up. You will see that you can be the person you want to be by shedding the coat of crap loaded on you.

Take the risk. Take the chance. You can do it. I believe in you and I am absolutely sure you can shed the shame cloak.

Go ahead try. You will win. Do not let the enemy called Shame win. Period.

Daring Greatly

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“We live in a world where most people still subscribe to the belief that shame is a good tool for keeping people in line. Not only is this wrong, but it’s dangerous. Shame is highly correlated with addiction, violence, aggression, depression, eating disorders, and bullying.”
Brené Brown, Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead